Competition Law, Patent Law and Technology Globalisation by Mark Summerfield

As noted in the Competition Policy Review Issues Paper, a primary underlying rationale for the grant of intellectual property (IP) rights is the fact that “creations and ideas, once known, may otherwise be copied at little cost, leading to under-investment in intellectual goods and services.”  Patents, in particular, are intended to provide an incentive, in the form of an exclusive right of commercial exploitation for up to 20 years, for investment in research, development and commercialisation of new inventions in all fields of technology.

This is the opening paragraph of a fascinating article written by Mark Summerfield of Watermark in which he considers competition law in the context of patent law. The full article is available here.

Mark blogs at patentology.com.au, and can be found on Twitter (@patentology) and Google+. He updates the patents chapter of CCH’s Australian Industrial & Intellectual Property service.

Competition Law, Patent Law and Technology Globalisation by Mark Summerfield
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About Anne Wardell

Anne Wardell is Editorial Content Manager at CCH and co-administrator of the Law Chat site.
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